The Literary Monster on Film – Five Nineteenth Century British Novels and Their Cinematic Adaptations

The Literary Monster on Film – Five Nineteenth Century British Novels and Their Cinematic Adaptations by Abigail Burnham Bloom

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3 stars

“The Literary Monster on Film – Five Nineteenth Century British Novels and Their Cinematic Adaptations” by Abigail Burnham Bloom focuses on the monster within and without the human being. Additionally, it deals with the Frankenstein film adaptation from 1931. I used it as inspiration and in order to create ideas for further research about film adaptations; the changes from the original story and how, if and what they changed in the films.

I chose to watch two movies to experience different adaptations of Frankenstein. Frankenstein by Thomas Edison from 1910 was the first movie ever presented with the tale of Frankenstein and naturally due to limitations of technology, it is silenced and shows the plot very theatrically. The second adaptation I chose to focus on is Frankenstein by James Whale from 1931. This adaptation presents the monster played by Boris Karloff, which is considered as the most iconic Frankenstein monster. While watching the movies I looked for differences from and similarities to the original novel.

Furthermore, chapter 2 in this source deals with the duality of Good and Evil, specifically in the novel Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which was also an interesting aspect of the story about Frankenstein, which I could use for a brief passage on psychological struggle seen in literature. For this purpose I chose to mention Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Dr. Jekyll & Hyde” (1886) and Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Shadow” (1847). Although, Frankenstein deals with other aspects, I found this angle very interesting because it is seen in both classic and contemporary literature.

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